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In the 18th and 19th centuries, wealthy British and European lovers exchanged eye miniatures, love tokens that captured the gaze of the recipients significant other. They were worn on the lapel as to be close to the heart.
Less than 1,000 are thought to exist, often both the owner of the piece and the subject within it are never identified.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, wealthy British and European lovers exchanged eye miniatures, love tokens that captured the gaze of the recipients significant other. They were worn on the lapel as to be close to the heart.

Less than 1,000 are thought to exist, often both the owner of the piece and the subject within it are never identified.

(Source: nzafro, via smallestthings)

warrenellis:

THE DIATOMIST is a short documentary about Klaus Kemp, master of the Victorian art of diatom arrangement. Diatoms are single cell algae that create jewel-like glass shells around themselves. Microscopists of the Victorian era would arrange them into complex patterns, invisible to the naked eye but spectacular when viewed under magnification.The best of these arrangements are stunning technical feats that reveal the hidden grandeur of some of the smallest organisms on Earth. Klaus Kemp has devoted his entire life to understanding and perfecting diatom arrangement and he is now acknowledged as the last great practitioner of this beautiful combination of art and science. THE DIATOMIST showcases his incredible work. Soundtrack by Ryuichi Sakamoto, Bernard Herrmann and Cults Percussion Ensemble. MATTHEW KILLIP is an English filmmaker living in New York. His documentaries have been broadcast on UK television and exhibited in festivals including Sundance and True/False. The Diatomist Matthew Killip

austinkleon:

John Cage performing “Water Walk” on the TV show I’ve Got A Secret in 1960

I consider laughter preferable to tears.

I’m reading a really good book about Cage and Zen Buddhism right now called Where The Heart Beats.

(Source: youtube.com)

austinkleon:

Lee Scratch Perry recording in Black Ark Studios

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

Lee Scratch Perry putting layers of music together in the Black Ark Studio.  What’s guiding him?

From Wikipedia:

Perry once buried microphones at the base of a palm tree and thumped it rhythmically to produce a mystifying bass drum effect and his drum booth at the Black Ark was for a time surrounded with chicken wire to further his distinctive sound. Many of his songs are layered with a variety of subtle effects created from broken glass, ghastly sighs and screeches, crying babies, falling rain and cow noises. While it was thought to believe that Perry recorded the “mooing” noises from actual cows, it was actually the baritone voice of Watty Burnett through a tin foil laced cardboard tube that produced the cow-like noises. These and other notable recording techniques helped define the Black Ark sound, as well as Lee Perry’s creative legacy.

Perry was known for his eccentric and superstitious behavior during production sessions. He would often “bless” his recording equipment with mystical invocations, blow ganja smoke onto his tapes while recording, bury unprotected tapes in the soil outside of his studio, and surround himself with burning candles and incense, whose wax and dust remnants were allowed to infest his electronic recording equipment. He would also spray tapes with a variety of fluids, including urine, blood and whisky, ostensibly to enhance their spiritual properties. Later commentators have drawn a direct relationship between the decay of Perry’s facility and the unique sounds he was able to create from his studio equipment.

Perry has described his relationship to the studio thus:

“I see the studio must be like a living thing, a life itself. The machine must be live and intelligent. Then I put my mind into the machine and the machine perform reality. Invisible thought waves - you put them into the machine by sending them through the controls and the knobs or you jack it into the jack panel. The jack panel is the brain itself, so you got to patch up the brain and make the brain a living man, that the brain can take what you sending into it and live.

Filed under: recording

aquaticwonder:

Ren Hang

(via mykeenknife)

lusidar:

Flying Beverages: Photo Series by Manon Wethly

lusidar:

Flying Beverages: Photo Series by Manon Wethly

(via mutilates)

galasai:

Édouard Levé

Pornographie, 2002

(via mutilates)

claytoncubitt:

There is probably something weird about you, about what you want to do, about how you want to do it. You’re probably not pulling it off yet. But the one piece of advice you should immediately ignore is the suggestion that you shear off the rough edges, regularize, de-complicate, become like whatever the advisor thinks everybody ought to be. Don’t do that. Be yourself. Be weird. Be singular. When the time comes, the thing that will lodge your work in the mind and heart of the readers for whom it will mean so much is the thing that right now is causing people to say the crippling words: No. Don’t. Can’t. Stop. –Kyle Minor
(via Clayton Cubitt on Instagram http://ift.tt/1qAvMkY)

claytoncubitt:

There is probably something weird about you, about what you want to do, about how you want to do it. You’re probably not pulling it off yet. But the one piece of advice you should immediately ignore is the suggestion that you shear off the rough edges, regularize, de-complicate, become like whatever the advisor thinks everybody ought to be. Don’t do that. Be yourself. Be weird. Be singular. When the time comes, the thing that will lodge your work in the mind and heart of the readers for whom it will mean so much is the thing that right now is causing people to say the crippling words: No. Don’t. Can’t. Stop. –Kyle Minor

(via Clayton Cubitt on Instagram http://ift.tt/1qAvMkY)